Events


96.1 FM Food Drive

Guirguis Law will be collecting canned and dry goods to benefit the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina this holiday season. Please drop off any donations at our office at 434 Fayetteville St., Ste. 2140, Raleigh. We are open from 9 am – 5 pm, Monday through Friday. 

For more information regarding the drive: http://www.961bbb.com/b-the-food/


Guirguis Law Sponsors Alerta Festival

On October 8, 2017, Guirguis Law was proud to sponsor the Alerta Festival in Durham, NC. It was an exceptionally great turnout with authentic food, historical dancing, and amazing people. We were able to meet and engaged with several members of the wonderful Durham County community. It truly was our pleasure to experience the Festival in its entirety and to help assist the citizens any way that we could. Be on the lookout for more Alerta news and events!


Durham Office Now Open

We are officially open for business in our new Durham Office located at 2530 Meridian Parkway, Durham NC, 27713. We are proud to now support the community and citizens of Durham County! Allow us to fight for you in Durham. Now accepting clients for any criminal, immigration, family, or civil law matters. Call (919) 917-5171 to schedule an appointment today.


 

NCSU Taylor Sociology Club

Attorney Nardine Guirguis, a proud graduate of NCSU, will the the guest speaker at the Taylor Sociology Club’s meeting on March 17, 2015.  Attorney Guirguis will be discussing how sociology works within the legal system.  The meeting will be held from 5:30 to 7pm in room 138 of the 1911 Building on NCSU’s campus.  On campus parking will be available to the general public after 5pm.


 

Conference on Race, Class, Gender and Ethnicity (CRCGE)

Cynthia Martinez, a paralegal with Guirguis Law, will attend a conference on “Southern Hospitality?  The Immigrant Experience in the U.S. South.”  The conference will be held on Saturday, February 28 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m at UNC’s School of Law.  For more information, including a schedule of speakers and registration information, please visit the CRCGE website at:  http://studentorgs.law.unc.edu/crcge/


 

 

African American Caucus of the NC Democratic Party

Attorney Nardine M. Guirguis, a Federal and State Law Specialist in NC, is honored to speak again for the African American Caucus of the NC Democratic Party. The Forum in which she will be speaking at is at the Rebuilding Broken Places in Goldsboro, NC (2105 N. William St., Goldsboro, NC 27530) from 1 – 3 PM. The Forum:  Prison Industrial Complex and the US Justice System – “Speaking for the Speechless.” 

Stop bullying and the School to Prison Pipeline

A collaborative meeting to stop bullying and the School to Prison Pipeline. The meeting will be held Saturday,  December 6,  2014 from 10am until 12:00Pm at:
 
Mount Church
1731 Traiwick RD
Suite 111
Raleigh, NC

Congreso El Corazon De DIOS:

Ministerio Internacional El Verbo en Accion
6 de Diciembre a las 5:00 PM estaremos celebrando ese maravilloso Congreso en donde DIOS  se glorificara en nuestras vidas de una manera poderosa.
1155 Long Branch Road
Dunn, NC 28344

 Forum: Prison Industrial Complex and the US Justice System – “Speaking for the Speechless

November 15, 2014

Nardine Guirguis is a speaker at this event. Join us!

The disproportionate and mass incarceration of African Americans is one of the
greatest civil rights problems facing the African American community across
America.

Since the passing of the Civil Rights Act over half a century ago, African
Americans have made significant strides toward the objective of ensuring equal
treatment under the law for all citizens – free of discrimination in housing,
employment, public accommodations and the right to vote. But in one critical
arena—criminal justice—racial inequality is growing, not receding.

This is why the African-American Caucus of the North Carolina Democratic Party
is committed to conducting a series of prison industrial complex forums to
educate the public and expose the exploitation of vulnerable citizens by a few
major industries.  

On November 15, 2014, the AAC-NCDP will hold a forum on the “Prison Industrial
Complex and the US Justice System: Speaking for the Speechless.” The location of
the event is Rebuilding Broken Places, 2105 N. William Street, Goldsboro, NC
from 1 pm – 3:30 pm.

A “Justice On Trial: Racial Disparities in the American Criminal Justice System”
report confirms that our criminal laws, while facially neutral, are enforced in
a manner that is massively and pervasively biased. The injustices of the
criminal justice system threaten to render irrelevant fifty years of a hard
fought struggle.

During the country’s 40-year war on drugs and get tough sentencing policies, the
American prison population exploded from 300,000 in the 1970s to more than 2
million today. The United States has a higher rate of incarceration than any
other nation and spends billions every year to keep people behind bars.

In a span of 35 years (1970 – 2005), the US prison population rose by 700% from
1970 to 2005, a rate far outpacing that of general population growth and crime
rates. An American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) study yielded the following:

1 in every 106 white males age 18 or older is incarcerated;
1 in every 36 Hispanics males age 18 or older is incarcerated; and  
1 in every 15 Black males age 18 or older is incarcerated.

The US espouses freedom, justice, and liberty, yet houses more of its citizens
in prisons than any other country in the world. The United States comprises 5
percent of the world’s population but 25 percent of the world’s prison
population, according to an ACLU study.  There are more African Americans under
correctional control today — in prison or jail, probation or parole – than were
enslaved in 1850, a decade before the Civil War began.

The “school-to-prison pipeline,” is a widespread pattern in the United States of
pushing students, especially those who are already at a disadvantage, out of
school and into the American criminal justice system. This pipeline is the
result of public institutions neglecting to properly address students as
individuals who might need extra educational or social assistance, or being
unable to do so because of staffing shortages or statutory mandates. The
resulting miseducation and mass incarceration create a vicious cycle for
individuals and communities.

In North Carolina, laws and policies have been enacted to restrict persons with
a felony conviction (particularly convictions for drug offenses) from
employment, receipt of welfare benefits, public housing, and eligibility for
student loans for higher education. Such collateral penalties place substantial
barriers to an individual’s social and economic advancement. Recidivism is fuel
for the prison industrial complex.

Mass incarceration affects African-Americans collectively, has held us hostage
in the past and holds us hostage today.  We must begin a reversal of repression,
national suicide and change our direction toward a true birth of freedom, mercy
and justice for all.

The African American Caucus – North Carolina Democratic Party (AAC-NCDP) will
continue to shine the spotlight on a flawed judicial system and demand that
policymakers address a myriad of issues that allow injustices to prevail.